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Given how much time we spend in the kitchen, it’s clearly a top choice when it comes to renovations. But the costs of doing one can be very steep, especially in NYC where everything often seems more expensive. Even a small-scale renovation can involve a lot of decisions and behind the scenes costs that are hard to estimate. This guide will help you to nail down the scope and expense of your project.

How much does an average NYC kitchen renovation cost?

Sweeten, a free service that matches homeowners with the best contractors has come up with rough estimates based on data gathered from previous projects. In 2017, the average cost of a minor, mid-range kitchen renovation in NYC was $26,000. For a major mid-range renovation, it was $75,000, while an upscale one averaged $140,000. It largely depends on how much customization you want. Start by dividing your costs into two categories, the cost of materials and the cost of labor.

Materials and appliances

There are plenty of factors that can affect the cost of your kitchen remodel. It largely depends on the cost of the materials and the size of your kitchen. These are the biggest expenses.

  • Appliances – When it comes to the stove, fridge, and dishwasher, expect to pay between $400 and $3,000 on each. You can pick up a sink for between $100 and $2,500 while faucet fixtures go for between $40 to $1,200.
  • Countertops – Here the prices can vary widely based on the types of materials you choose. Laminate counters start from below $10 per square foot to between $50 and $125 for certain materials like recycled glass. For high-end materials like marble, granite, and acrylic the prices can vary from $100 to $300 per square foot.
  • Cabinets – For stock and made-to-order cabinets (Ikea, Home Depot etc.) expect to pay between $600 and $2,000 per linear square foot. For custom cabinetry, the price goes up to $1,000-$2,000
  • Lighting – You have a good deal of leeway when choosing how much to spend on lighting. On the low end, you can spend between $25-$50 per piece while at the high-end you can easily spend $500 and above.
  • Backsplash – On the low-to-mid range you can spend from $3 to $15 per square foot. For higher-end materials like stone or marble finish prices can be $35 and up per square foot.

Behind the scenes costs

The cost of materials is relatively easy to compute, what’s more, difficult is those behind-the-scenes costs.

  • Building Requirements – Your building requirements will play a large part in dictating your design and budget. For instance, there may be an insurance coverage minimum which will limit you from hiring contractors that aren’t carrying high-value insurance policies. If the building has an alteration agreement, that can place further limits on who you can hire. Contractors that have the coverage to work in buildings with high requirements tend to have higher operating costs.
  • Design – This is the planning phase where you’ll work directly with your contractor and architect to create detailed drawings for the renovation. You’ll also make your final decision on materials at this point. The design phase is of critical importance and often represents 15-35% of the renovation cost.
  • Demolition & Site Prep – Some heavy work will be needed in order to get your kitchen ready for its makeover. To start with, the walls and flooring must be stripped to frame and level, respectively, before installation can begin. The average cost of this phase can easily reach $4,000.
  • City Permits – If you’re having extensive plumbing work done you’ll need plumbing permits. These are required by the City’s Department of Buildings and can run up to $2,000 per permit. Any electrical work may require an electrical permit which can run up to $900.
  • Installation – Appliances are normally installed when you purchase them or sometimes come with an added delivery and installation fee. Negotiations with your contractor will allow you to determine final labor costs but keep extra funds in store to cover any delays or unexpected problems.

 

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